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Which four different levels of structure do proteins have?

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The term structure when used in relation to proteins, takes on a much more complex meaning than it does for small molecules. Proteins are macromolecules and have four different levels of structure. Do you know which four are there?
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primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary lol
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I thought there were only two: soy boy protein, and meathead jock protein.
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There are four protein structure – primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary. Primary Structure There are 20 different standard L-α-amino acids used by cells for protein construction. Secondary Structure Stretches or strands of proteins or peptides have distinct characteristic local structural conformations or secondary structure, dependent on hydrogen bonding. The two main types of secondary structure are the α-helix and the ?-sheet. Tertiary Structure The overall three-dimensional shape of an entire protein molecule is the tertiary structure. The protein molecule will bend and twist in such a way as to achieve maximum stability or lowest energy state. Quaternary Structure Many proteins are made up of multiple polypeptide chains, often referred to as protein subunits.
May be you can find a more detailed answer here:
https://www.particlesciences.com/news/technical-briefs/2009/protein-structure.html
and
https://www.creative-biostructure.com/protein-crystallization-and-structure-determination_13.htm
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A photo of Anonymous Anonymous
If you already knew the answer to this, then why bother asking in the first place, f@g?
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