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Medicine

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I am currently in grade 11, and I always have wanted to become a doctor. But recently I don't think that's a possibility, I have an 85 in Biology, and I've been told that mark is not up to University standard, It was my midterm but everyone around me is getting 90s, and they get pretty upset about it. I've been told three times that I am not smart enough to get into any University or to become a doctor. Is it true that an 85 is too low? I am willing to work harder, and I want to become a doctor, but should I give up? Should I even bother applying to UofT or UW? I am so nervous and confused
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Lol. You're in high school. There are kids with 4.0 GPAs getting gender studies degrees and walking into med school. You have a lot of research to do.
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hey I am a doctor (was on this site for my kids) - I agree you have to do research but more importantly why do you want to become a doctor - its extremely competitive to get in - top marks at university - people end up doing master/PhDs just to get in and its hard work once you're there - so its hard to get in, competitive when you get there and a stressful job - not for everyone- my advice is broaden your horizons and don't ignore more applied programs that would allow you to apply to medicine if that is what you still want but give you a skill - kinesiology, physiotherapy (also super competitive, you need to do tons of extra stuff) - don't get stuck on a general science degree - doing just OK in those programs goes nowhere - also take grade boosters as universities outside of the program requirements primarily look at marks rather than the course itself - also don't get stuck on going to any university just to go - do not ignore college programs that might again give you applied skills because all anyone talks about is university -
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This is excellent advice! This is why I chose to do nursing degree first, if I still want to try to apply to medical school I can apply to McMaster, as they just use the verbal reasoning portion of the MCATS or take a year or so of a life science program to prepare me to pass the full MCAT's required by other medical schools. I can also choose to be a nurse practitioner, who are able to diagnose and prescribe. There are many  challenging and gratifying fields in the medical profession, don't get stuck only on being a medical doctor.
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Don't worry about your high school grades or even what undergraduate program you attend. You don't HAVE to go to McMaster Health Science to go to Med School. You could do a Women's Studies degree at a tiny university, and you'd probably have an easier time getting into Med School because you'd have higher university marks.

Just make sure you get good grades in university and that you take all the required prerequesites.
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No offence kid, but do you even know what med schools look for? This is very simple research you can do in 10 minutes. If you're serious about medical school, then you should have the capacity to do a minimum amount of research into med school admissions requirements. 

To start, unless you're French and applying to a school in Quebec, medical schools in Canada look at your UNIVERSITY MARKS, and NOT your high school marks. Do you even know that you can't get into med school directly out of high school in this country? The only exception is Queen's Quarms which accepts 10 students nationally into their accelerated med school program. 

If you're this gullible to other high school students determining your future, and just want to give up, then yes, I agree that you should just forget about med school. What does applying to U of T or Waterloo have to do with medical school admissions? Waterloo doesn't even have a med school. 
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Hey! i found some links that you can check out! low key don't feel like typing everything else out again bc i just did for another post, however, here are all the links and if you are interested, definitely check em out! 

https://www.trentu.ca/premedicalstudies/program/pathways-medicine-trent-advantage-webinar
https://www.trentu.ca/premedicalstudies/stgeorges
https://www.trentu.ca/premedicalstudies/programs/premedical-option
https://www.trentu.ca/premedicalstudies/programs
https://www.trentu.ca/futurestudents/degree/medical-professional-stream?target=undergraduate
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I don't know who Arabella O'hera is, but because he/she/they has been promoting St. George's on these forums, I feel the need to put out this warning: If you are a Canadian citizen or PR and currently in high school, I strongly urge you to not even consider going to the Caribbean (e.g. St. George's, Ross, etc.) for medical school right now.  
It is a path where for most people means they will never be able to practice medicine in North America but will have hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt and no realistic way to pay it off. There is more to being a practicing physician in Canada than just getting a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree. Think of the end goal, not the short term. What's an extra few years of university education in Canada in the short term if it means you can be a practicing doctor in the long term? I'm an Ontario medical student currently, and it pains me so much when these for-profit medical schools (YES, medical schools in the Caribbean earn a profit off of your tuition, which is very different from almost all universities and colleges in Canada and the US) target high school students and knowingly lie about the reality of international medical graduates (IMGs) in the Canadian residency system. Do your research; don't take anything these schools or current students at these schools say without thinking about their biases.
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+1

I was about to make a similar post but you beat me to it. Students falling for this scam are ultimately fools who should have done better research. It's a harsh thing to say, but it's true. There are these scam programs now targeting high schoolers for law too (I'm a lawyer). Trent has the BA/Swansea LLB and Laurier the BA/Sussex LLB programs targeting naive and foolish high school students. 
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u of t accepts you for life science with a mid to high 80s average so you should be OK.
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High school grades do not directly translate into what your university grades will be. NO ONE at this point in time can predict whether or not you will in the future get into medical school. At this point in your life, focus on doing reasonably well in high school (around a 90 average in grade 12 will get you into some great university programs) while exploring your interests. It's entirely possible that along the ride your interests shift towards something else, or you may stay dedicated to your passion for medicine- either is perfectly okay. Apply for programs that interest you, while keeping in mind if they offer what's needed to study for the MCAT, and whether you're okay self studying some of these courses. Once you're in university, works towards achieving a high GPA, a strong profile of other activities like student clubs or volunteering, and studying towards your MCAT. There is no reason at this point to doubt yourself right now.
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I know someone who had mid to high 80's in high school, and now they are studying medicine at Mac. They excelled in their undergraduate, and they are killing it in med school. On the other hand, plenty of students who achieved 90's in high school are crushed when they can no longer achieve those high grades with ease. If you are truly passionate about medicine, you will get there. You might not get into competitive "pre-med" programs like Mac's health sci or Western's med sci, but as a nursing student who works closely with these "pre-med" students, I can tell you that many of them are not cut out to be doctors. On the other hand, I've met lots of students in the general sciences who fit the mold. Your high school grades are not reflective of your potential as a student, so don't let your current grades deter you from perusing a career in medicine. 

If you are seriously interested in health care, I urge you to look into other professions and careers within the field. There are so many options out there that people aren't familiar with. I'm a little bias, but nursing is a incredibly rewarding career that combines the science of medicine and the art of nursing. If you were to compare an MD to a Registered Nurse (Bachelor of Science in Nursing graduate), the MD has a deeper understanding of anatomy, physiology, pathology, biochemistry, etc. in order to make a medical diagnosis and devise a plan to treat the disease. Even though nursing students still study all of this content, they don't go into as much detail as a med student. A nurse practicing in a hospital is then responsible for carrying out this treatment plan, which involves a great deal of knowledge with regards to the health sciences. Personally, I chose nursing because I wanted to be the person that is directly caring for the patient, as opposed to treating the disease. In general, nurses spend more time interacting with patients than MD's. An RN may also obtain a specialized masters degree from which they can become a nurse practitioner. A nurse practitioner, within their scope of practice, can diagnose and prescribe. The only differences between a primary health care nurse practitioner and a GP is that the NP cannot prescribe narcotics, and I may be wrong, but I don't think they can refer a patient to a specialist unless collaborating with an MD. Physician Assistant's, although they are not common in Canada and Mac offers the only PA program in Canada (I believe), work closely with MD's to diagnose and prescribe. The major difference between an NP and a PA is that a NP is educated from the nursing model, while a PA is educated from the medicine model. You might also consider medical radiation sciences, which is often used as an undergraduate before applying to med school. Sorry for writing an essay...I was warming up my fingers for taking anatomy notes. High school is stressful, regardless of what any university student says, but you've got this!
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